A New Year, A New Schedule!

Posted in Other on January 6, 2010 by comicmole

Happy new year all!  My new year’s goal for Comic Mole is, rather than having a flurry of updates and then nothing for a month or two, to pace myself to one update every two weeks and try and keep to a steady schedule.

Its unfortunate that I probably can’t manage anything more frequent than a bi-weekly update schedule, but such is life I guess.  I know I’d rather read a blog with a slow but steady stream of updates to one that randomly dumped loads of stuff on me then went dead for weeks at a time!

Actually, it has been suggested that perhaps I could cast about for folks who might like to do a guest review or two.  If anyone likes that idea then please get in touch!  You would need to be able to write about as well as me (e.g. you don’t need a degree in English or anything, but people should hopefully be able to understand what you’re on about ^_~ ).  If anyone were to jump on this idea then their work would be added in between my bi-weekly updates, thus taking us to the dizzying heights of weekly updates every now and then! (if anyone would like to re-visit anything I have already talked about, that’s fine, multiple opinions on things are always welcome)

My first review of the year should be this weekend, once I’ve had a chance to type up my horrendously old fashioned analogue notes into magical digital form.

And with that, I shall bid you farewell until the weekend ^_^

‘Much Ado about Nothing’ from Manga Shakespeare: a guest article by Kate Holden

Posted in Guest Article with tags , , , , , , on October 26, 2009 by comicmole

William Shakespeare, adapted by Richard Appignanesi & illustrated by Emma Vieceli, 208 pages, A5 softback book, Self Made Hero, £6.99.  Available in high street bookstores or online stores such as Amazon.

After a break from our mini ‘Emma Season’ on Comic Mole in order to announce some new releases for the London Expo, we’re back to round it up with another fun and informative guest article from Kate Holden!  This time she takes a look at SelfMadeHero’s Manga Shakespeare version of ‘Much Ado About Nothing’, once again from the point of view of a reader with a degree in English Literature.

Mole note: spolier alert for Much Ado!  This article is best read if you already know the basic story and characters of Much Ado About Nothing, either having read it, seen it on the stage or as a film etc.

Once again, I’ll hand you over to Kate now…

muchAdoCover

If ever there was a Shakespeare play to be adapted into comic form that would sound like a daunting prospect to me, Much Ado is it.  It’s not high concept.  It doesn’t have a big, obvious hook.  No ghosts, no cross dressing, no magic, no fights, no deaths.  Not like Romeo and Juliet, which can be excitingly summed up as, ‘two star-crossed lovers take their life!’.  No, this is something different.  ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ is a deft and subtle play, jam-packed with wit.  In many ways it feels like a precursor to the ‘Comedy of Manners’ genre of plays from the later Restoration period.

As the title suggests, in this play there’s an awful lot going on over not much of importance.  The title itself is an understatement, since there’s a life at risk among other things, but that understatement is what makes it such a fitting title, as this is an understated work that really plays with language and meaning.  To make it successful as a comic requires a lightness of touch.  While this publication has the same illustrator as Hamlet – it’s Emma Vieceli again, albeit with a few years’ more experience giving a more polished look – the style and setting are quite different.  Much Ado employs finer inking and more diffuse tones, so unlike the heavy and sparse feel of Hamlet, this comic has a more shoujo manga (girls manga) feel and a summery atmosphere.  The setting is meticulously reproduced by Vieceli from real Italian scenery.  This isn’t quite a period adaptation.  Or rather, it is, but a later period from Shakespeare’s time.  The overall feeling of the costumes and setting is quite timeless, which I feel works well.  Much Ado is a rather deft and effortless-feeling play, and the art here matches with an elegant, light and airy classical look.

MuchAdoExample1

The play primarily concerns two very different couples.  First we have Claudio and Hero.  Claudio and Hero are young, likely teenagers.  Claudio has just won a lot of honour by performing bravely in war, ‘doing with the body of a lamb, the feats of a lion’.  Having come home with thoughts of battle put behind him, he notices Hero in a new light and Romance comes to mind.  In this adaptation, Claudio and Hero are depicted as two wide eyed and innocent characters, often flushed or excited.  You could easily compare them to Romeo and Juliet.  The plotline of their romance follows a similar course, but with a comedic happy solution rather than a tragic one (Romeo and Juliet reads like a comedy until about halfway through, but I think that’s something to discuss in a later article).  They fall head-over-heels in love, are torn apart by family circumstances, but fortunately there is a happy solution at the end involving trickery and a dramatic reveal!

MuchAdoHeroClaudio

The other couple, and the real stars of the show in this adaptation (they’re on the front cover!) are Benedick and Beatrice.  These two are older and more jaded.  They courted in the past, but fell out and have spent their time since incessantly battling wits.  In this adaptation they look probably around their late twenties to early thirties.  While not particularly old, they contrast the wide-eyed idealism of Claudio and Hero.  Benedick is a lovable rogue in his dishevelled outfit with a slight Han Solo air about it.  He is portrayed as flippant and cheeky, but still quite chivalrous.  Beatrice is an elegant and confident lady, shown by her more elaborate and mature clothes, hairstyle and manner compared to the girlish Hero.  Her personality is calm and cool, kind, but with a barbed tongue, particularly where Benedick is concerned!

MuchAdoBeatrice

Of particular note in this play is the scheming villain, Don John.  He’s a strange character because he doesn’t really have a good reason to want to mess with everybody.  He’s a dark character, portrayed here with black hair and clothes and a solemn demeanour.  His status as a bastard child, unlike his brother, and his less gregarious personality seems to have given him an inferiority complex.  He enjoys causing strife because he doesn’t enjoy socialising.  Notice how he and the Prince are quite similar looking, separated mostly by the colour and style of their hair.  Don John is like a shadow of John Pedro.  Both characters intentionally manipulate those around them, but the Prince does so to make a match, while his brother does so to break one apart.  Don John has the urge to disrupt a society he feels doesn’t welcome him, but rather than admitting his feeling of powerlessness and abandonment, chooses to say that his motivation is just plain villainy.

Manipulation is a recurring theme throughout the play.  In this adaptation, notice how the theme is represented through puppets.  Don John is seen with a puppet of Don Pedro, and later we see Don Pedro with puppets of Benedick and Beatrice.  Masks and music also recur as themes, though this isn’t just in the manga adaptation, but part of the play.  Performance is frequently employed, and for most of the play no single character seems to be aware of what everybody else is up to.  Every character seems to be, for good or bad reasons, involved in some kind of secret plot manipulating somebody else!  A visual theme used here is the apple.  My interpretation of the apple is that it is the symbol of ‘cupid’s trap’.  It symbolises romantic temptation, and the clever plot used on Benedick and Beatrice.  Rather than forcing them together, they are lured to each other in order to realise feelings that were there all along.

MuchAdoApple

Much Ado About Nothing is an enjoyable read.  It’s a subtle and complex romantic comedy, and while it may not have the conceptual punch or high drama of some of the other plays, particularly tragedies, if you’re willing to look closely it is a real masterwork, very intricate and yet tightly plotted.  While it may seem light and fluffy on the surface, it has hidden depth and complexity.  The art matches well.  While it’s not so conceptually or thematically bold as ‘Hamlet’ you may well find pleasure in its clever, understated and polished execution.  Like the play, it may look effortless, but there’s a whole lot of thought and detail there and a huge amount of hard work!

Once again thanks go out to Kate Holden for giving her time to write this article for us here on the Mole!  Kate is a member of the UK manga circle IndieManga and currently has work featured in their latest anthology release ‘Legends‘, as well as her own webcomic ‘Fan Dan Go‘, which updates twice a week.

New Comic: Between Worlds

Posted in New Comic with tags , , , , , on October 21, 2009 by comicmole

betweenWorldsCover

Tis the season of new comics (October Expo season that is), and this year the IndieManga table will be the home of this delicious-looking new edition of ‘Between Worlds’ by Anna Fitzpatrick, alongside IndieManga’s new anthology ‘Legends’, which also features more work by Anna.

Between Worlds first debuted last year as a full-colour limited-edition run.  This new volume is a black and white version of the atmospheric hand-painted comic, friendlier to the more price-conscious among us at £4.

However, if you can afford the £15 price tag, I still recommend asking Anna if she has any copies of the limited edition left for sale, as the artwork really sings in full colour (as you can probably tell by the cover image above).

To see more of her work, check out Anna’s art blog Between Two Worlds.

New Comic: Talking to Strangers, from Sweatdrop Studios

Posted in New Comic with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 19, 2009 by comicmole

talkingToStrangersCover_CM

‘Talking to Strangers’ is a new anthology from Sweatdrop Studios, which is debuting at the upcoming October London MCM Expo.  Its a black and white book that boasts a page count of 228 at a standard price of £7 (but will have a special price of £6 over the Expo weekend).  More information, plus page samples, can be found on the thread over on their forums.

This comic is a collection of short stories written by Fehed Said (who also wrote The Clarence Principle) and illustrated by a variety of up-and-coming UK manga talent.  The book features work by

But don’t worry if you can’t make it to Expo!  Sweatdrop assure us that will we be available from their online shop soon after the event.  This promises to be a world-class release, so do keep an eye out for it if you’re going to the show ^_^

New comic: Legends, from IndieManga

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 19, 2009 by comicmole

legendsCover_CM

Debuting at the upcoming October MCM Expo in London, ‘Legends’ is the latest anthology book from UK manga circle IndieManga.  It will be a black and white book of 130 pages with a price of £6.00.  It will feature work from

  • Kate Holden, who should be familiar to Comic Mole readers as the multi-talented creator of the webcomic Fan Dan Go, as well as writing our recent literary article on Hamlet from Manga Shakespeare
  • Rebecca McCarthy, a writer who’s shorts ‘The King’s Silver’ and ‘Rake’ appeared in IndieManga’s first anthology ‘Origins’
  • Anna Fitzpatrick, who’s hauntingly beautiful comic ‘Between Worlds‘ will also be seeing a new release at the October Expo.
  • Sally Jane Thompson, who created Little Thoughts and had a story in Leek and Sushi’s Manga Show: 150 Years of Friendship, amongst other things.
  • IndieManga’s new member! Sarah Burgess, who also writes the fantastic webcomic ‘Far Out Mantic’

So all in all a pretty exciting new anthology title from some proven independent talent! More information plus preview pages can be found on IndieManga’s website.  The comic should also be available to order online from the website shortly after the event, for all those (like me) who can’t make it to the show this year ^_^

New Comic: Dragon Heir Reborn

Posted in New Comic with tags , , , , on October 19, 2009 by comicmole

DH_rebornImages

Hot on the heels of her announcement in our recent interview, Emma Vieceli has unveiled the first five pages of her new series ‘Dragon Heir: Reborn’ as a webcomic.  Its free to read so go check it outHer blog post about it provides some more info, and would-be commenters are directed there too.  Happy reading!

‘Hamlet’ from Manga Shakespeare: a guest article by Kate Holden

Posted in Guest Article with tags , , , , , , , on October 4, 2009 by comicmole

William Shakespeare, adapted by Richard Appignanesi & illustrated by Emma Vieceli, 196 pages, A5 softback book, Self Made Hero, £6.99.  Available in high street bookstores or online stores such as Amazon.

Mole note: spolier alert for Hamlet!  This article is best read if you already know the basic story and characters of Hamlet, either having read it, seen it on the stage or as a film etc.

So without further ado, I’ll hand you over to Kate…

HamletCover

Let’s look at Emma Vieceli’s Hamlet:

Hamlet, as I’m sure you’ve been told, is considered one of the greatest works of Literature that exists. Sadly Hamlet is often forced upon school children too young to appreciate it, causing a lifelong resentment of something that’s truly brilliant. Reading the dry text, I have to admit even with a degree in English Literature, can be a chore. To truly experience Hamlet, you need to see it. Because of this, I feel that reading the Manga Shakespeare adaptation is an excellent way to experience the story, as it is much closer to seeing it performed on the stage or on film.

It is important to remember, however, that all performances of Shakespeare plays are interpretations. This comic is an adaptation of the text. The dialogue has been condensed to two hundred pages, and illustrator Emma has made her own decisions about the setting and characters based on her interpretation of the text.

In this article, I will attempt to explain the comic adaptation from a literary perspective in plain English, and point out some interesting things. Since Emma Vieceli also has a degree in English Lit, you can be assured that this adaptation has been considered intelligently.

HamletToBe

Hamlet is a tragedy. The definition of a tragedy is a story concerning the downfall and death of a character who is mighty and heroic, save for an unfortunate fatal flaw. For example, Shakespeare’s Macbeth is a noble man who is brought down by his own ambition (or possibly the ambition of his wife, depending on your interpretation). Hamlet is a particularly complex tragic hero. He becomes obsessed with bringing the truth to light, yet seems paralysed into inaction by his own inner turmoil. There is a lot of discussion about Hamlet’s age in Literary criticism. As a character, he is fascinating depicted as any age, but for a manga adaptation, I have to say I find Emma’s depiction of him as a dashing young adult bishounen quite pleasing! Emma’s Hamlet is less brooding than some depictions. She chooses to emphasise his quick wit, dark humour and his more active and flamboyant side. This works to great effect for the portion of the play in which he feigns madness, and makes him a strong, shounen hero you can root for in a sword fight. Hamlet is noted in the play for his dark, funereal mourning clothes, which he continues to wear some time after his father’s death, to the discomfort of the rest of the court, who are in wedding garb to celebrate his mother’s wedding.

HamletClothes

Hamlet’s clothes are a statement of his disapproval of his mother’s rather early remarriage to her husband’s murderer, and Emma has given his look a rebellious gothic flair which really sets this off. Her Hamlet is a witty, swashbuckling rebel. Perfect, in my opinion, for a comic adaptation.

While we’re on the subject of casting, some other interesting things to note would include Rosencrantz and Guildenstern being presented as twins. This is quite appropriate to the rather unnatural way in which the pair seem to act as one person. They are presented here almost as emotionless dolls and rather unsettling. This reflects their strange role in the play as seemingly unfeeling plot-movers. They eventually die offstage and their death is mentioned merely as a kind of side note.

Ophelia and Laertes deserve a mention, as Emma does a particularly good job of setting them up as very warm, loving siblings before tragedy strikes. Before her madness, Ophilia is portrayed as a very sweet, bubbly girl, and even playing in the river where she will eventually drown in a fit of insanity. By highlighting the comedy in the play, and the brief moments of happiness the characters find, this adaptation makes the tragedy more poignant.

You may not know that Hamlet was originally written as a History. All tragedies in Shakespeare’s day were based on history by tradition. They did tend to be rather loose adaptations of history, and often were based on legends with little actual historical basis, not to mention that they were hugely inaccurate through artistic licence. So Hamlet is based on a real Prince, Amleth, who lived in Denmark hundreds of years before Shakespeare’s time. Shakespeare was an entertainer, not a historian, and so the details of the story bear close to no resemblance to what’s reported in history, not to mention, the details of life the characters discuss reference life as it was in Shakespeare’s time, not the period of the setting. I expect that the costumes would also have reflected contemporary fashions and not been based on those of Medieval Denmark. Since Shakespeare adapted his plays from the stories with so many licenses, I have no problems with any director or artist who does the same when adapting his plays. They are not written as accurate histories, so the setting should be created to reflect and emphasise the events and emotion of the play. In this case, the setting is dark, post apocalyptic cyberpunk.

HamletBlindfold

The mixture of Gothic and Futuristic in the adaptation may feel a little jarring in places, but Hamlet is a play all about time being mixed up. It even contains the line ‘The time is out of joint’. There are many untimely deaths during the play, and the people of the present are haunted by ghosts of the past. Bones are dug up from the earth and casually tossed around. Nothing is allowed to just let lie in the story, as you’d expect since it starts with a dead king wandering around! The sparse, post-apocalyptic setting emphasises the hopeless feeling of the plot, and the theme of untimely death, by setting it in a dark and largely dead world. Another theme worth noting is information. The characters are constantly plugging themselves into information devices in this comic. Hamlet is a scholar, a man always searching for truth. The act of finding, searching and passing around information is shown in this adaptation through the futuristic setting, and it nicely complements the themes of how everybody is after information. The play begins with a question; “who’s there?” and revolves around a question, “to be or not to be”, and a plot to uncover the truth. By placing emphasis on the act of searching for truth as a physical action, the manga Hamlet makes the theme clear to the reader.

Overall, Hamlet is one of the most richly nuanced of Shakespeare’s texts, and any given adaptation may be very different from any others you have seen, almost to the point of feeling like a different play. The manga adaptation excels because rather than trying to portray a mere generic version of the play with fancy period dress, just going though the motions, it uses a setting, cast and visual metaphor to actually emphasise the important themes, as well as make the story feel like something belonging to the manga medium. Far from being just a dumbed-down ‘for teenz’ version, this is an adaptation which can be studied and analysed just as much as any film or stage production of the play. It’s well worth giving it a close read and taking time to notice the careful details and symbolism, especially if you’re using it as a study aid. If you’re not a Lit student, and just looking to enjoy your Manga Shakespeare books on a deeper level, try reading along with some study notes, which you can find online quite easily, and thinking about why the books chose a particular setting, as well as the depictions of the characters in appearance, age and personality. See how these versions compare to stage productions or films. You’ll find that you can keep coming back and noticing new things. That’s the magic of Shakespeare!

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Many thanks to Kate Holden of IndieManga (aka. Darth Mongoose) for her time in writing this article on the Manga Shakespeare Hamlet from a more literary standpoint than I would be able to.  The observant among you will have probably noticed that Kate also creates comics, in fact her webcomic Fan Dan Go has just rebooted from scratch today!  So go check that out if you like the idea of some super colourful retro fantasy action.

If you liked this article then please say so! And I will try to get more points of view, or different takes, on more fantasic UK indie/small press comics in the future ^_^

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